Temp: | |

Showing the way with mind’s eye

Teacher Kolluru Lakshminarayanamma, who is visually challenged, singing along with students at her house in Visakhapatnam.— Photo: C.V.Subrahmanyam
Teacher Kolluru Lakshminarayanamma, who is visually challenged, singing along with students at her house in Visakhapatnam.— Photo: C.V.Subrahmanyam

Visually impaired teacher personifies never-say-die tenacity

Teacher, writer and singer- all rolled into one- visually impaired Kolluru Lakshminarayanamma personifies a never-say-die tenacity.
A municipal school teacher, she identifies with children tapping their latent talent and pens quick, topical skits to create awareness on issues like education, health and gender equality and patriotic songs.
She helps them even with etiquette and the growing up-problems and pitfalls teens from poor households face. She takes them out for parks and the beach as their parents cannot do it.
After school, a few students in the vicinity regularly gather to learn some songs for radio programmes to which she takes them or do their home work.
“I never waste a moment and whether it is my regular teaching or preparing for extra-curricular activities keep children’s interests in mind,” the 48-year-old teacher says.
Born visually impaired, Ms. Narayanamma went to the government school for visually impaired in Hyderabad up to SSC and later completed her intermediate and degree at BVK College here. She obtained 16th rank in the open category in the B.Ed. entrance examination and completed the course from SAMD College, Rajahmundry.
After obtaining post-graduation in history from Andhra University, she did her law degree. She pursued her PhD in history. “The thesis part of it is ready and the viva voce has to take place. I want to approach Andhra University authorities to sort out the issues and complete it,” she says.
Appointed as school assistant after the District Selection Test in 1998, she joined as municipal teacher here. She now teaches at the GVMC M.V.D. High School, Dandu Bazaar.
She used to write her notes during graduation in Braille. Once on a casual comment from one of the family members, she wrote continuously for 24 hours in Braille, she recalled.
She wanted to use the ability to do something of significance and took up writing the Bhagavad Gita in Braille during 1990-92 which earned her recognition.
She donated her entire notes from school days to post graduation to the Helen Keller Memorial Association for Blind here.
With music and special Telugu as subjects in B.A., she is now an AIR artist in light music. A long time back, she published her book of poems in free verse Sirachukkalu (Drops of ink) under the pen name ‘Jnanajyothi’ and it was published by a local cultural organisation, Sahridaya Sahiti. She renewed her creative writing with Mummy, Amma Kavali , a story which she wrote for AIR last year.
“I have finished five more of late and adding another six I want to bring a short story volume,” Ms. Narayanamma says.Read More...

0 comments